Until Tomorrow: An existential snapshot during COVID-19

This documentary aims to create a ‘public manifesto’ that emphasises these mindful declarations as we all deliberate the state of our futures…

As the world turns in flux, reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic; the usual uncertainties of life, have been multiplied and amplified. Alongside the ambiguous future, the pandemic has unceremoniously revealed the precarity and folly of political leadership on a global scale. In the absence of such leadership, the daily commute and 9-5 structure, it has left many, more time to think; reassess their lives, the world, and their place in it. 

Capturing a snapshot of those thoughts, vulnerabilities, and existentialism is artist and filmmaker Katie Scott, with Until Tomorrow, an anthropological documentary filmed during Lockdown.

Katie Scott gives a brief insight into her visual manifesto and forthcoming documentary Until Tomorrow.  

Q) Tell us a bit about yourself…

I am a London based visual artist who specialises in film making and photography. My practice combines an interest towards archaic image-making techniques and the clashing culture of the digital era-defining the, ‘new aesthetic’. I will shortly be returning to complete my final year studying illustration and visual media at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London.

Q) How would you describe yourself in five words?

I find that very hard.

Q) You’re currently working on ‘Until Tomorrow’, a documentary filmed during Covid-19 pandemic – what’s the context of the film?

The visual documentary I am creating during the COVID pandemic is a political and anthropological study that follows a collective of people’s experiences and findings during this period of stillness and acute apprehensiveness. Inspired by the ontology of dreams, our relationship with technology and personal relationships during this moment in time, while considering the future of all economies – this documentary aims to create a ‘public manifesto’ that emphasises these mindful declarations as we all deliberate the state of our futures…

Q) How has the experience been for you and what interesting or surprising things you have learnt thus far from your research?

What I’ve found really interesting throughout this whole process is how open and willing people are to share their personal anecdotes and respond to creative collaboration. My previous approach to all of my projects in comparison was quite inclusive, however from this, I have learned the simple benefits of reaching out and approaching a more interactive research process. I have the utmost faith that the creative industries have the strength to survive this crisis due to the positive response this project has received and witnessing many others emerge at this time.

The traction the project has received on a global level has also been overwhelming and in result has meant a virtual family of contributors and beautiful individuals have come together which has been the highlight of this whole process.

Q) Covid-19 has left the world in a state of suspension over ‘the future’ – how has this experience impacted your perspective of the future?

I think there is a certain outlook I would like people to adopt in the coming together of the so-called ‘new normal’. Having now witnessed the collapse of our capitalist and politically corrupt regimes – I want to believe that the future will support more mindful and ethically conscious communities around the world, demonstrating our potential to resort to resourcefulness and generosity in business, as we come up with creative solutions to repair the damage and heartbreaking loses we have suffered during the pandemic.

Having now witnessed the collapse of our capitalist and politically corrupt regimes – I want to believe that the future will support more mindful and ethically conscious communities around the world

Q) What’s been your most exciting/challenging experience while creating ‘Until Tomorrow’?

Learning how to adapt to practice during this period of confinement of course has had its challenges, however, I am grateful for the project opening up my experience working with people of all occupations and ages all around the world to put together this collective visual manifesto during the COVID pandemic. This is by far the most meaningful project I have done to date and that is something I would never have anticipated. The main challenge I have endured during this experience of course has been subject to scheduling and encouraging people to open up to a stranger on their personal reflections.

This has definitely progressed throughout the project as after each conversation my skills communicating, listening and responding have dramatically improved. I have also felt an intense pressure to please everyone involved in the project and make sure they feel well represented and cared for. However, I feel that is only a sign that I’m on the right track.

Q) What tools / apps have been essential to you during the Lockdown?

Processing / Final Cut / Premiere / InDesign / Zoom

Q) What’s on your current reading / playlist?

James Bridle – The New Dark Age

Michael Lobel on art and the 1918 flu pandemic via ARTFORUM

Can the art market weather the coronavirus storm? (Podcast Series)

100 Artist Manifestos – Fluxus Manifesto, p363

Naomi Klein – How big tech plans to profit from the pandemic

Eva Respini – Art in the Age of the Internet

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